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20130121
20130129
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it is also about making long- term arguments about what government has done. all too often, not just our candidates but people on the front lines often find our content with the talking points. the clinton problem is that it's a political problem. -- cocoon problem is not just a political problem. how to reengage more -- people in this room in impacting this argument. creating a space where politicians are more comfortable doing it. >> one challenge that we have with appealing to women voters, i think it is also true of men who are -- who only have a high school diploma are have trouble finding a good job. and obama's america, we are all having trouble finding a good job. [laughter] women think that when they are voting for democrats they are voting for security. single women, many of whom have children and who feel quite vulnerable to job losses or any change in the economy or anything that might around in their own lives -- might go wrong in their own lives. they want that safety net. it is not an easy sell, but we have to make the case that what you think is security is not. because,
and not the government, which is what obama believes is the demint -- the definition of the collectivity. if all that is true, and i think it is, i think that four more years are on the course of drift, on the course of expanding the government at the expense of the private-sector and will have results that will be unsustainable and there will be a shift away from it, which makes me rather optimistic about the future in the medium term, although i'm not that optimistic about the short-term. >> we will build more into the causes, the selection -- this may be a false choice, but to what extent you think the outcome had to do with romney s weaknesses as a candidate and how much had to do with the content he was trying to sell and the stillness of it, how much the circumstances the economy was unable to brand obama. >> the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a set -- was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the intrusiveness expansion of the pyramid. it was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and there
their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu musab al-zarqawi. we were very sure he was there at the beginning of early 2004. we started to track his work. in the spring of 2004, when falluja became the first spot in the country where they held ground -- they actually, al qaeda and the sunni, elements working with them at that hope oh -- point, held at bay the forces for a couple of months. it was pure what they had built was not only thoroughly passionate, but it was also extensive. zarqawi was an interesting role. to get to the heart of the question, there was a question about -- an issue about did he really matter. the answer is yes, he did. he mattered in a big way.
what i am concerned about. it was not saying there is absolutely no role for government. these people have to pull themselves up by the bootstraps. i think we can do more and more of telling those stories with a places like national review. we have to highlight the things that work. when people see it, it makes a huge difference as opposed to sterile principle or policy that we may know sounds good, but we want to feel good about it. >> there are two was to message to people, whether they are consumers, voters, your neighbors. shock the conscience is pretty obvious. we always have to have our hair and hands on fire when we talk about something. does not always have to be an anti obama statement. i actually prefer to ignore him more than anything. one day i will wake up and he will not be president. i can spend time with people who are useful to advancing the ideas and the belief systems that we have in free market and religious liberties and limited government and the family etc.. what about the warm the heart? that is really important. people say, that will not move of
, a government of, and by, and for the people, entrusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed. and for more than two hundred years, we have. through blood drawn by lash and blood drawn by sword, we learned that no union founded on the principles of liberty and equality could survive half- slave and half-free. we made ourselves anew, and vowed to move forward together. together, we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce, schools and colleges to train our workers. together, we discovered that a free market only thrives when there are rules to ensure competition and fair play. together, we resolved that a great nation must care for the vulnerable, and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortune. through it all, we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority, nor have we succumbed to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of initiative and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, these are constants in our character.
on the table. >> i have often wondered and explored this if people have an appetite for limited government? americans in general, the government keeps getting bigger. we struggle to obtain the a slower right of growth, which is a great vibtry in a way it is. have you found an appetite for limited government? or limited government for others and not for themselves? >> i believe so. i said often times in the campaign trail that the constitution is very popular and big government is not popular. that is where we should anchor our program and policies. you saw this in the president's speech on monday even though it was a very liberal speech. he didn't call for big government. >> the inaugural address? >> yeah, the inaugural address. that's because he knows what bill clinton knew in 1996, that big government is over. so i do think -- >> the era is over. >> yeah. again, if political leaders will explain the circumstances and choices that we face and make the case for limited government, free market economics and constitutionalism the americans will side with those principles and they always have
experienced the majesty of our democracy. only possible in a form of government that as of, by, and for the people. they made it possible because there are patriots just like each and every one of you that defend our freedom every single day. this party is just another way to say something we can never say enough. thank you for volunteering, thank you for stepping up, thank you for keeping us strong, thank you for always making us proud. i have no greater honor than being your commander in chief. it is because the view that we were able to end the war in iraq. because of you, we deliver justice to osama bin laden. because of view, it is possible to give afghans' a chance to determine their own destiny. we are going forward and we will keep the fighting force that the world has ever known. tonight, we're also joined by some of our service members and afghanistan. we can see them on this monitor. general, are you there? >> and good evening, mr. president. commander at third infantry division, we are honored to be able to join you there this evening. the we are joined by some fant
of our time. so we must harness new ideas and technology to remake our government, revamp our tax code, reform our schools, and empower our citizens with the skills they need to work harder, learn more, reach higher. but while the means will change, our purpose endures: a nation that rewards the effort and determination of every single american. that is what this moment requires. that is what will give real meaning to our creed. we, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause] for we remember the lessons of our past, when twilight years were spent in poverty and parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky, or happiness for the few. we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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